RyanOwen

Ryan Danny Owen 

And after that we didn’t see each other much

Show Runs: April 3 – Apr 28, 2017
Reception: April 5, 5:30 – 7:30 pm
Main Mall, at the Alberta College of Art and Design

Marion Nicoll Gallery, LRT Space
Alberta College of Art + Design

And after that we didn’t see each other much is composed work-examining roles of iconic masculinity and sentimentality challenging notions of sexuality, the past, loss, and queer identity. Blue jeans and white shirt was this fabricated uniform of masculinity, through its connections to idealistic men like James Dean, or Steve McQueen. It was the look of liberated urban street fashion. Tightfitting white shirt tucked into tightfitting blue jeans, evokes the expression of the nostalgic sexual male. I use this as an abundantly overtly romanticized nostalgic expression of male sexuality and a means to explore the absent male body and as an act of silent rebellion in claiming these iconic images of nostalgic masculinity as queer and sentimental.

Ryan Danny Owen is a Calgary-based artist who will graduate from the Alberta College of Art and Design Drawing program in 2017. His work examines queer identity, loss, desire, and time through the exploration of the dynamics of ruins, memorials, and relationships.

The MNG Main Space is currently undergoing prep for the 2017 Spring Grad Show, which will have an opening reception on May 18th! Please stay tuned for further information and for upcoming Sled Island programming!

GRADSHOW IMAGE

 

KellieReid

Kellie Frances Reid- Gathered Thoughts for You

Exhibition Runs March 27 – May 26
Reception May 11, 6pm – 7pm
at Arts Commons, with optional drinks to follow at the Palomino
Marion Nicoll Gallery,
+15 Space at Arts Commons

Sip tea in quiet contemplation.
Thinking of you.
All the things I said,
All the things I didn’t.
I get the words right.
Not right at all.
Gathering thoughts for you.
The handwoven objects in Gathered Thoughts for You act to embody the time and care we invest in our relationships. Replacing ephemeral objects, like teabags, paper, and handwritten notes, with handmade cloth speaks to the sentiment we place on both the objects and rituals we associate with our loved ones. Our smallest gestures and most silent moments bare witness to those we hold dearest.
Kellie Frances Reid is a textile artist living in southern Alberta. She uses both traditional and non-traditional weaving techniques to create sculptural works which explore the human body, relationships, and communication. She will be graduating in May 2017 with a BFA from the Alberta College of Art + Design.

 

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